Do I Qualify for an EAD in the United States?

If you’re looking to live and work here in the United States, one of the most important things you can do is first get an Employment Authorization Document, also known as an EAD. Please continue reading and reach out to our dedicated work authorization permit lawyer in Milwaukee, WI to learn more about whether you’ll qualify and how our legal team can help you get one. Here are some of the questions you may have:

How do I know if I can get an EAD in the United States?

The first thing you should understand is that not everyone automatically qualifies for an Employment Authorization Document. You must first be authorized to work in the United States either because of your immigration status as a refugee, U nonimmigrant, or an asylee. If you need to apply for permission to work in the United States, such as if you have a pending Form I-589, you will also need to obtain an Employment Authorization Document. In this case, you’ll need to file Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization.

Is there a way to renew an Employment Authorization Document?

Fortunately, if you’re looking to extend your stay and your time working here in the United States, you can renew your EAD. If your EAD is expiring or has recently expired, you can file for renewal by submitting a new Form I-765 and a filing fee.

What should I do if I can’t find my Employment Authorization Document?

If your EAD has been lost or stolen or is otherwise no longer in your possession, you can file a new Form I-765 with a filing fee. In some cases, you may not have to pay the fee if you request a fee waiter. You should also note that if your EAD contains any errors, such as a misspelling of your name, you can submit the card to USCIS with a description of what was incorrect with the document, and you shouldn’t have to pay a filing fee of any kind.

If you have any additional questions about living and working here in the United States, please don’t hesitate to speak with our seasoned immigration law firm. We are here to help you in any way we can.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C., and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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Fair and Human Charge Rule Published

If you’ve been paying attention to the news this past year, you most likely heard about the U.S. Department of Homeland Security proposing a “Fair and Human Public Charge Rule” back in February. If you’re an immigrant who is either about to come to this country or already in this country, it was likely welcome news. We’re happy to announce that now, as of September 8, 2022, DHS has made a final rule to be published in the Federal Register regarding what constitutes a “public charge.” Read on and speak with our knowledgeable Wisconsin immigration attorneys to learn more about the ruling and what it may mean for you.

What is a public charge?

Essentially, when an immigrant comes to this country, they must provide proof that they will not become a “public charge,” at any point, and if they should need financial assistance, that they’ll have someone in the United States who can support them financially. The previous administration declared that Medicaid and nutritional assistance were to be considered public charges, something that simply wasn’t the case in years past. Because of this decision, many immigrants were left wondering about their future here in the United States.

Fortunately, now, DHS has ruled that Medicaid and nutritional assistance are no longer public charges and those who accept these forms of financial assistance don’t have to worry about losing their right to remain here in the United States.

Of the recent Fair and Human Public Charge Rule, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas said, “This action ensures fair and humane treatment of legal immigrants and their U.S. citizen family members. Consistent with America’s bedrock values, we will not penalize individuals for choosing to access the health benefits and other supplemental government services available to them.”

If you have any questions about the recently finalized rule, or any other immigration-related questions, please don’t hesitate to speak with our legal team today. We are here to provide clarification and help you in any way we can.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C., and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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What is an I-601 Waiver?

As an immigrant, there are few things worse than either being denied re-entry into the United States or being forced to leave the United States. That said, this is something that happens virtually every single day, and on a wide range of grounds. However, fortunately, some who’ve been denied entry into the U.S. can re-enter through what’s known as an I-601 waiver, formally known as a Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility. Please continue reading and speak with a seasoned I601A Waiver Lawyer in Milwaukee, WI to learn more about these waivers and how our legal team may be able to help you through the process ahead. Here are some of the questions you may have:

Am I eligible for an I-601 waiver?

When someone enters the country illegally or has overstayed their visa and wants to apply for permanent residency, they will have to do so with a consult outside of the United States. However, if you’re in the U.S. illegally but leave, you will likely be subject to a three or ten-year bar from reentering the United States. However, by applying for a 601-A waiver, you may be exempt from this bar. If you were considered inadmissible either due to a criminal conviction, illegal entry into the U.S., a security violation, or because you have a certain health condition, you may be eligible to get this bar waiver if you can prove that a spouse or parent who is legally in the United States would suffer extreme hardship if you’re not allowed to return.

What is extreme hardship?

There are various circumstances that may technically qualify as extreme hardship. Some of those circumstances are as follows:

  • They have a medical condition and require you to care for them
  • They have another sick family member and need your support to care for that family member
  • They are financially dependent on you and you cannot provide sufficient financial support from abroad
  • They are in debt financially and cannot pay off those debts without your support

If you think you may qualify for this waiver or you’d like to discuss this matter further with a lawyer, please don’t hesitate to speak with Sesini Law Group, S.C. today.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C., and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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Update Regarding DACA Policy

Many immigrants enter the United States in search of a more prosperous life every single year. That said, children who entered this country illegally with their parents, they were forced into a situation beyond their control. Because of this, the DACA program was instated to help protect children who were brought to this country from deportation, and give them a shot at eventual citizenship. That said, over the years, there has been a great deal of back-and-forth regarding DACA, and the futures of DACA children were left largely in jeopardy. Fortunately, USCIS recently announced an update to its DACA program that should work to the benefit of DACA children, many of whom are now young adults. Please continue reading and reach out to our seasoned family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to learn more about the update and what it may mean for your future.

What does the most recent DACA update mean for my future?

Recently, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas announced that a final ruling has been issued to preserve and fortify the DACA policy for eligible noncitizens who entered the United States as citizens. This includes over 800,000 people in the program.

Of the decision, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director Ur M. Jaddou said, “DACA has transformed the lives of its recipients and has made us better and stronger as a nation. USCIS is proud to play an important role in implementing the DACA final rule and is committed to ensuring DACA recipients can continue to remain a vital part of their communities and contribute to this country that is their home.”

Ultimately, the announcement finalizes the existing threshold for DACA, retains the process for DACA requestors to get work authorization here in the United States, and legally recognizes DACA recipients as lawfully present persons here in the United States.

If you would like to learn more about DACA, the recent ruling, and what it may mean for you, please don’t hesitate to speak with our seasoned legal team today. We are here to help.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C., and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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How Can I Help My Relative Get United States Citizenship?

As a United States citizen with foreign-born relatives, you’re most likely looking to help them gain citizenship here in the U.S. as well. Please continue reading and reach out to our experienced family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, WI to learn more about how we can help your relative get U.S. citizenship. Here are some of the questions you may have:

Does a Form I-130 help a relative get citizenship?

Yes, it can. Form I-130, known as the Petition for Alien Relative, is the first thing you’ll need to complete to have your relative gain United States citizenship.

Where do I file this form?

If you’re living in the United States and are a citizen, you will file this form either at the Chicago, Dallas, or Phoenix lockbox. However, if you’re a United States citizen, are residing somewhere outside of the United States, and are looking to file for either your unmarried child under the age of 21 or your parents, you’ll have to file at the USCIS international office in your current country.

If there is no location for a USCIS international lockbox, you will file at the Dallas lockbox. In this form, you’ll have to detail exactly how you’re related to the person you’re filing for, as well as various other additional personal info, including:

  • Your mailing address
  • Your marital status
  • Evidence of your citizenship here in the United States
  • A copy of your birth certificate
  • Your relative’s full name
  • Your relative’s date of birth
  • Your relative’s physical address
  • Your relative’s marital information

Our firm can help ensure you include all of the necessary information in your Form I-130.

Do I have to pay to file Form I-130?

You will have to pay to file the Form. Currently, it will cost you $535 to file this form. You will have to pay the fee either through money order, personal check, cashier’s check, or by credit card via Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions. Our legal team has extensive experience helping individuals through this process, and we are here to put that experience to work for you. If you have any additional questions about how the process works or how you can lawfully get your relatives into the United States, please don’t hesitate to pick up the phone and give us a call.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C., and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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Read Our Latest Blog Posts

  •  Do I Qualify for an EAD in the United States?
  •  Fair and Human Charge Rule Published
  •  What is an I-601 Waiver?
  •  Update Regarding DACA Policy