What Is the Newest Action to Keep Immigrant Families Together?

Recently, the Biden-Harris Administration announced an executive action set to bar migrants, who cross over the southern border unlawfully, from receiving asylum in our country. This was to secure our country’s southern border. However, at the same time, the Administration understands how it is equally important to keep mixed-status families living in the United States together. So, on June 18, 2024, President Joe Biden announced a new action to better protect these American families. Read on to discover more about the newest action to keep immigrant families together and how a seasoned family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, WI, at Sesini Law Group, S.C., can help you better understand what this means for you and your family.

What is the Biden-Harris Administration’s newest action to keep immigrant families together?

In simple terms, the Biden-Harris Administration’s newest action holds that the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) must begin taking initiatives to ensure that United States citizens with noncitizen spouses and children can stay together.

Specifically, this may be accomplished by helping facilitate the lawful permanent residence application process for noncitizen spouses and children. Of note, this is a status that noncitizen spouses and children may already be eligible for; but now, they may not be expected to leave the country during the application process. Further, eligible noncitizen spouses and children must have resided in the United States for 10 or more years, as of June 17, 2024. This is in addition to satisfying all other applicable legal requirements.

What does this newest action do to help college graduates and “Dreamers”?

The Biden-Harris Administration hopes that giving noncitizen spouses and children lawful permanent resident status may also have the bonus of strengthening the county’s economy. Well, the second part of this newest action, to ease the visa process for United States college graduates and “Dreamers,” shares a similar goal.

That is, the Administration simultaneously announced that individuals who have earned a degree at an accredited United States institution of higher education in the United States, and who have received an employment offer from a United States employer in a related field, may receive a work visa at an expedited pace. That is, by helping facilitate the work authorization application process.

Importantly, these individuals may also include Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients and other Dreamers. Again, the hope is that these individuals may use the skills and expertise, which they received in our country in the first place, to then benefit our country.

This is all to say that now is a better time than ever to apply for lawful permanent residence or work authorization. In conclusion, there is no need to second-guess your decision to retain the services of a competent family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, WI. This is because we guarantee that someone at Sesini Law Group, S.C. will know how to guide you through every step of the way.

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What Should I Know About the New Action to Secure the Border?

The Biden-Harris Administration has continually taken action toward securing our country’s border. But the most recent action may significantly change our immigration system as we know it. Follow along to find out what this new action entails and how a proficient family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, WI, at Sesini Law Group, S.C. can help you better understand how this may affect you.

What should I know about the Biden-Harris Administration’s new actions to secure the border?

On June 4, 2024, President Joe Biden announced an executive action set to bar migrants, who cross over the southern border unlawfully, from receiving asylum in our country. Of note, this action was issued under Immigration and Nationality Act sections 212(f) and 215(a). It is accompanied by an interim final rule from the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security, which also bars asylum from these specific migrants.

Generally speaking, this action is supposed to be in effect whenever the encounters at the southern border are at such a high level that they exceed immigration officers’ capability to act productively. Essentially, this is all in an effort to relieve some of the burden carried by immigration officers on a daily basis.

On top of all this, this action may significantly increase the consequences for those who cross over the southern border unlawfully. Specifically, these individuals may find themselves subject to at least a five-year bar to reentry, along with the possibility of criminal prosecution.

What else does this executive action entail?

It must be emphasized that this action is not permanent. Rather, it may be discontinued when the level of migrants who cross over the southern border is low enough that the immigration officers can safely and effectively manage it on their own. What’s more, this action acknowledges humanitarian exceptions, such as children who cross over without being accompanied by an adult. Or, individuals who cross over who have previously been victims of severe forms of trafficking. Also excepted are lawful permanent residents or other noncitizens of the United States with a valid visa or other lawful permission to enter the country.

Moreover, this action may entail raising the standard used to screen for the protections mentioned above. That is, while this action is in effect, these individuals may only be referred for a credible fear screening with an asylum officer if they explicitly express a fear of returning to their home country (i.e., a fear of persecution or torture). In other words, those who articulate an intention to apply for asylum in the United States.

As you may have already concluded yourself, this is an impactful proclamation that may likely impact you and your family. This is to say that there may be no better time than now to seek legal counsel. So please pick up the phone and call a talented family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, WI, from Sesini Law Group, S.C. We look forward to hearing from you.

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What is an EB-3 Visa?

Like many others, it may be your dream to work, not to mention have a successful career, in the United States. Well, you may be happy to hear that there are many avenues to achieve this. That is, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) offers several types of employment-based visas to interested foreigners. Meaning that your chances of qualifying for at least one is heightened. This blog will specifically focus on the employment-based third preference visa, more commonly referred to as the EB-3 visa. Read on to discover the eligibility criteria for an EB-3 visa and how a seasoned work authorization permit lawyer in Milwaukee, WI, at Sesini Law Group, S.C., can help determine whether or not you qualify.

What is an EB-3 visa and what are its eligibility criteria?

Put in its simplest terms, an EB-3 visa is the third-preference category for employment-based permanent residency in the United States. Of note, there are three subcategories in which you may meet the eligibility criteria. The commonality amongst these three subcategories is the requirement of proving you perform a certain type of labor that is not readily available by workers already in the United States. Without further ado, they read as follows:

  • A skilled worker; to qualify, you must:
    • Prove you possess at least two years of job experience, education, or training to meet certain requirements on a labor certification.
    • Prove you possess certain post-secondary education that may constitute training for certain requirements on a labor certification.
  • A professional; to qualify, you must:
    • Prove you possess a United States baccalaureate or foreign equivalent degree to meet certain requirements on a labor certification.
    • Prove you possess any other requirements for a labor certification.
  • An unskilled worker; to qualify, you must:
    • Prove you possess two years or less of job experience or training in a certain labor that is not of a temporary or seasonal nature.
    • Prove you possess any other requirements for a labor certification.

What are the other categories of employment-based visas?

To reiterate, an EB-3 visa is a third-preference visa. So this means that there is a first-preference and second-preference visa, namely an EB-1 visa and an EB-2 visa, respectively. Without further ado, the subcategories for both are as follows:

  • Subcategories to qualify for an EB-1 visa:
    • You possess an extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics.
    • You are an outstanding professor or researcher in a particular academic field.
    • You are a certain multinational manager or executive.
  • Subcategories to qualify for an EB-2 visa:
    • You possess an advanced degree or its foreign equivalent.
    • You possess an exceptional ability in the sciences, arts, or business.

Understandably so, you may be uncertain which employment-based visa you qualify for, if any at all. If this is your case, what you need the most is likely solid legal advice from a competent work authorization permit lawyer in Milwaukee, WI. Someone at Sesini Law Group, S.C. is awaiting your phone call.

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How Can I Prepare for My Green Card Interview?

All those who apply for permanent resident status (i.e., a green card) in the United States must attend an interview with a United States Citizenship and Immigration (USCIS) officer. This is arguably the most pivotal part of your application process. That is, any misstep you make during your interview may prompt the USCIS officer to deny your petition outright. Basically, your future in this country may be in the hands of this officer. Continue reading to learn how to best prepare for your interview and how an experienced green card lawyer in Milwaukee, WI, at Sesini Law Group, S.C., can help you practice.

How can I effectively prepare for my green card interview?

You cannot walk into your green card interview blind. Similar to having to study for an examination at school, you must do some reviewing before your interview date. This may entail looking over your application and all the supplemental documents you have submitted thus far. This is because you want your answers to the USCIS officer to align precisely with what you disclosed in these documents.

For example, you do not want your provided marriage and divorce decrees to show you were previously married for 10 years but tell the officer your marriage lasted 15 years. Or, you do not want to deny that you have ever visited the United States before but your provided copy of your passport proves otherwise. In either of these cases, the officer may grow suspicious of you. So if you have undergone actual changes since submitting your initial application, you must prepare to mention it to the officer straightaway and bring evidence that supports it.

What questions can a USCIS officer be expected to ask me in my interview?

While on the topic of honesty, you must answer the USCIS officer’s questions with nothing but the truth. This is regardless of whether the truth may paint you in a negative light, as the alternative of lying is a much more punishable offense. Understandably so, you may be nervous during your interview and stumble with some of your answers. But the best way to avoid this is to practice your answers beforehand. Without further ado, below are expected questions that you may practice answering:

  • What countries have you traveled to before?
  • What countries do you have a citizenship status in?
  • What countries have you lived in for the past five years?
  • Where and who have you worked for in the past five years?
  • Have you ever been married and do you have any children?

To effectively prepare for these questions, you may have a skilled family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, WI conduct a mock interview. In the end, you may rest easier knowing that our team can serve as your needed support system during this stressful time. So please call us at Sesini Law Group, S.C. today.

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What if My Green Card Is About to Expire?

You may be relieved that the hard work you put into the immigration process has finally paid off and that you can now reap the benefits of being a United States green card holder. However, you cannot get too comfortable in this position, as your green card may be set to expire at some point in the foreseeable future. That is, you must take proactive steps well before this expiration date approaches. Continue reading to learn what to do if your green card is about to expire and how an experienced green card lawyer in Milwaukee, WI, at Sesini Law Group, S.C., can help you renew it.

What is the expiration date on my green card?

Of note, green cards issued before 1989 do not have expiration dates. However, most green cards have an expiration date of 10 years from the date of issuance. Or, if you carry conditional permanent resident status, your green card may only be set to last for two years.

What should I do if my green card is about to expire?

You must keep an updated green card because this may be the only way to prove your legitimate permanent resident status in the United States. This is to say that an out-of-date green card may hinder your proof of your ability to travel to and from the United States and your eligibility to work in the country.

So, if the 10-year mark on your green card is rapidly approaching, you must begin to prepare Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card. Without further ado, listed below are the types of information the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) may expect you to include in this application:

  • You must disclose your personal biographical information (i.e., name, date of birth, physical address, country of birth, etc).
  • You must disclose where you initially filed for your green card (i.e., a United States embassy, United States consulate, or USCIS office).
  • You must disclose whether you are a permanent resident, commuter, or conditional resident.
  • You must include a copy of your green card that has expired or is set to expire in the next six months.
  • You must include your payment of the required $465 filing fee.

It is worth mentioning that there is no limit to the amount of times you can renew your green card. However, instead of going through this process every 10 years and paying the filing fee each time, you may consider more sustainable options. For example, you may check your naturalization eligibility to see if you should apply to become a United States citizen instead.

To allow for the best outcome to be reached, you may retain the services of a skilled family immigration lawyer in Milwaukee, WI. Contact Sesini Law Group, S.C. today.

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Read Our Latest Blog Posts

  •  What Is the Newest Action to Keep Immigrant Families Together?
  •  What Should I Know About the New Action to Secure the Border?
  •  What is an EB-3 Visa?
  •  How Can I Prepare for My Green Card Interview?