U.S. Travel Documents | What You Need to Know

There are a lot of different ways to enter the U.S. Read on to learn more about the different travel documents available to those who wish to enter the U.S.

What Visas Do I Need for a Short-Term Stay in the U.S.?

Some of the most common types of short-stay visas the U.S. government issues are as follows:

  • Business visa: This allows foreign nationals to engage in commerce in the U.S,
  • Working holiday visa: This allows individuals to obtain temporary work here in the U.S. while they are traveling.
  • Transit visa: If you plan on passing through the United States to reach a destination outside of the country, you will need a transit visa, which generally only allows individuals to stay up to 10 days, and sometimes as short as a few hours.
  • Private visa: If you were someone who was invited to the U.S. by a U.S. resident for a private visit, you may receive a private visa.
  • Medical visa: You may obtain one if you require medical treatment/diagnostics from a specific medical professional in the U.S.
  • Tourist visa: These visas are reserved for a short period of leisure/tourist travel.
  • Athletic or artistic visa: These are reserved for competing athletes, performing artists, and the like.
  • Cultural exchange visa: Generally for athletes/artists participating in cultural exchange programs.

What Visas Do I Need for a Lond-Term Stay in the U.S.?

There are various visas the U.S. government offers to individuals who are looking to stay in the U.S. for a longer, albeit limited period of time. Those visas are as follows:

  • Refugee visa: If you are a foreign national seeking to flee significant danger in your country, such as persecution, natural disaster, or otherwise, you may receive a refugee visa.
  • Student visa: This allows foreign nationals to receive higher education here in the U.S.
  • Asylum visa: Not dissimilar to the refugee visa, asylum visas are granted to those who are fearful of persecution in their country due to race, beliefs, associations with a particular group, etc.
  • Temporary worker visa for approved employment: The most common type of worker visa is the H-1B visa.
  • Journalist visa: For journalists who wish to report for their news organizations in the U.S.

If you have any questions about the various travel documents available in the United States, contact our experienced firm.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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What Does USCIS Say About Vaccines? | What to Know

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in serious travel restrictions and caused extended delays to the immigration process. Now that vaccines are rolling out, restrictions are being lifted. Read on to learn about the latest announcements from the CDC and USCIS.

Due to CDC guidelines, USCIS has updated its policies, stating, “fully vaccinated individuals no longer have to wear a face covering. Individuals two years old and older who are not fully vaccinated must still wear a face covering.” You will be considered fully vaccinated if it has been at least two weeks since the second shot of your two-dose vaccine, or two weeks since your one-dose shot.

USCIS has announced that they have “eased other requirements for fully vaccinated individuals who do not have COVID-19 symptoms. Those who have returned from domestic air, international air or cruise ship travel in the past 10 days may enter USCIS facilities if they are fully vaccinated. Individuals who have been in close contact (within six feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with anyone known to have COVID-19 in the previous 14 days may also enter USCIS facilities if they are fully vaccinated. Healthcare workers who consistently wear an N95 respirator and proper personal protective equipment or equivalent when in contact with COVID-19 positive individuals continue to be exempt from reporting close contact.”

If you have any questions or concerns about traveling at this time, our firm is here to help. Reach out to speak with an experienced immigration law attorney today.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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The H-2B Program and the Latest Updates | What to Know

When it comes to entering the United States, there are a number of ways to do so. Everyone has a different situation, so it is important to find the way that works best for you. For some, this may be through the H-2B program. Read on to learn more about the program and the latest announcement.

What is the H-2B Program?

H-2A and H-2B visa programs allow United States employers to bring foreigners to the country in order to fill temporary agricultural and nonagricultural jobs. H-2B refers to the Temporary Non-Agricultural Workers program. This is a highly competitive program for many people because the United States puts a cap on the number of people who are eligible to be employed as an H-2B nonimmigrant worker each year.

What is the Process?

In order to become eligible for this program, an employer must petition for the worker they are hiring. They must prove that the United States does not have enough of their own workers who are able nor willing to do the work. It is important to know that it is only temporary work. For example, it may be seasonal work. Additionally, the petitioning employer has to prove that there will be no negative impact on wages or working conditions of U.S. workers by hiring H-2B workers. Finally, petitioning employers must go through the United States Department of Labor in order to obtain a valid temporary labor certification. This can be a difficult process, so it is best to speak with an experienced immigration attorney.

What did USCIS Announce?

According to uscis.gov, “The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of Labor (DOL) have published a joint temporary final rule making available an additional 22,000 H-2B temporary nonagricultural guest worker visas for fiscal year (FY) 2021 to employers who are likely to suffer irreparable harm without these additional workers. Of the supplemental visas, 6,000 are reserved for nationals of the Northern Triangle countries of Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala.”

If you have any questions or concerns about the H-2B program or the latest announcement, feel free to contact our firm today.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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What is TPS and What are the Latest Updates?

The United States has built a clause into its immigration law known as Temporary Protected Status (TPS) that allows people from certain countries to remain in the U.S. because their native countries have been deemed unsafe due to environmental conditions, violent conditions, or any other extreme scenario. This allows them to live, work, and travel to and from the U.S. during the length of time in which a Temporary Protected Status has been put in place. Read on to learn more about TPS and the recent announcement regarding Haitian immigrants.

Who is Eligible for TPS?

Temporary Protected Status is granted to individuals from countries that are experiencing difficult or dangerous situations, such as civil war, health epidemic, environmental disaster, or other factors that may prevent these nationals from returning home safely. Haiti was granted Temporary Protected Status after the 2010 earthquake that devastated the nation.

A Brief History of TPS for Haitians

As previously mentioned, Haiti was granted Temporary Protected Status in 2010. This TPS has been extended over the years until the Trump administration sought to end it in 2018. But, the Biden administration has recognized the devastating effects of COVID-19 on Haiti and its citizens.

What are the Latest Updates Regarding TPS?

According to CBS, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas has explained that “Haiti is currently experiencing serious security concerns, social unrest, an increase in human rights abuses, crippling poverty, and lack of basic resources, which are exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.” As a result, the United States is working to support Haitian nationals until they can safely return home to Haiti. According to BuzzFeed, “The Biden administration will grant more than 100,000 Haitians in the US the opportunity to gain temporary protected status, shielding them from deportation and allowing them to obtain work permits…”

It is important to note that this announcement only applies to Haitians who are currently in the U.S., and not those who travel to the country after the announcement was made.

If you have any questions or concerns about TPS or the latest updates, contact our firm today to speak with an experienced immigration attorney.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

 

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What to Know About a Pending Green Card Application

If your green card application is pending, you may have a lot of questions about the process and what you can and cannot do while you wait. Below are some of the most commonly asked questions regarding pending green card applications in Wisconsin:

What Happens if I Move While my Case is Still Pending with USCIS?

If you move while you have a case pending with USCIS, you will have to update your address within 10 days of your moving. If you fail to update your address within 10 days of the move, you may not receive crucial information about your case. You can update your address through your USCIS online account, or you can file the Form AR-11, Alien’s Change of Address Card, via the USCIS Change of Address online page.

What Happens if I Leave the United States while my Form I-485 is Pending?

Emergencies happen, but if you need to leave the United States while your case is pending, you must file the Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, before leaving. Unfortunately, if you leave the country without filing an advance parole document while you still have a pending Form I-485, you will effectively abandon your application. This will most likely mean losing your opportunity to obtain a green card.

How Long Does it Take USCIS to Process a Form I-485 in Wisconsin?

If you submit a Form I-485 in Wisconsin, your case should be processed between 6.5 months to 20.5 months. If it has been more than 20.5 months since you’ve submitted your application, feel free to reach out to our firm to discuss your case. To check the status of your pending application, you can either call USCIS at 800-375-5283 or visit USCIS’s Case Status online page and enter the receipt number you obtained after filing your Form I-485.

If you have any questions or concerns, reach out to our firm of experienced attorneys today.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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Read Our Latest Blog Posts

  •  U.S. Travel Documents | What You Need to Know
  •  What Does USCIS Say About Vaccines? | What to Know
  •  The H-2B Program and the Latest Updates | What to Know
  •  What is TPS and What are the Latest Updates?