Documents Needed for Exchange Visitor Visa

Documents Needed for Exchange Visitor Visa

If you are considering submitting an application to participate in an exchange visitor program, it is important that you have an idea of the different documents that you need to apply. In any process that requires a lot of documents, it is really important that you keep all of your documentation organized. It is important that you make sure you have everything you need in advance because if you lose one, it can delay the process tremendously.

Passport

Make sure that you have a valid passport that will allow you to travel to the United States issued by whichever country you are coming from. If your passport is set to expire soon, make sure you get a new one that is valid for at least 6 months after the time in which you had planned your time in the U.S. to end.

Photograph of yourself

With your Nonimmigrant Visa Application, you will also need to upload a photo. Photo requirement includes that you do not have glasses on in the photo, you have a neutral facial expression, it is taken in front of a white background, and that you do not have a hat on that you do not wear daily.

Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor Status

Make sure you are registered in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System, or SEVIS, and that you receive Form DS-2019 from your exchange program’s sponsor. 

If you have questions about applying for an exchange visitor visa, contact an experienced immigration attorney who can provide you with assistance.

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. If you have any questions regarding these matters, please contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and obtain your initial consultation.

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