What is the SIJ program?

What is the SIJ program?

The United States Citizen and Immigration Services has implemented a program known as Special Immigrant Juveniles Status, or SIJ. The primary goal is to help children that have been orphaned by their parents obtain a Green Card. The children that are eligible for this program have generally been neglected or abused by their parent. This Green Card allows them to work and live in the United States permanently.  In order to become eligible for this status, you must determine whether or not you are qualified to apply.

Some of these qualifications can include being under the age of 21 at the date you file your petition form, being unmarried throughout the entire process, and being inside of the United States when you file your form. A lot of the decisions in the SIJ program process are made by the state court of whichever state you reside at the time of filing. The court of the state in which you reside must declare that you would be put in danger if you were to return to your home or last lived in country, that you should not be reunited with the abusive or neglectful parent, and that you depend on the court or the agency that you have been appointed the dependent of.

The Special Immigrant Juveniles Status can be very beneficial for those who are looking to escape the dangers of an abusive parent. If you are seeking a Green Card and believe you may be eligible to apply for SIJ status, you should speak with an experienced immigration attorney who can assist you with your case and discuss what your best options may be.

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. If you have any questions regarding these matters, please contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and obtain your initial consultation.

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