What Does USCIS Say About Vaccines? | What to Know

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in serious travel restrictions and caused extended delays to the immigration process. Now that vaccines are rolling out, restrictions are being lifted. Read on to learn about the latest announcements from the CDC and USCIS.

Due to CDC guidelines, USCIS has updated its policies, stating, “fully vaccinated individuals no longer have to wear a face covering. Individuals two years old and older who are not fully vaccinated must still wear a face covering.” You will be considered fully vaccinated if it has been at least two weeks since the second shot of your two-dose vaccine, or two weeks since your one-dose shot.

USCIS has announced that they have “eased other requirements for fully vaccinated individuals who do not have COVID-19 symptoms. Those who have returned from domestic air, international air or cruise ship travel in the past 10 days may enter USCIS facilities if they are fully vaccinated. Individuals who have been in close contact (within six feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with anyone known to have COVID-19 in the previous 14 days may also enter USCIS facilities if they are fully vaccinated. Healthcare workers who consistently wear an N95 respirator and proper personal protective equipment or equivalent when in contact with COVID-19 positive individuals continue to be exempt from reporting close contact.”

If you have any questions or concerns about traveling at this time, our firm is here to help. Reach out to speak with an experienced immigration law attorney today.

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John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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What is TPS and What are the Latest Updates?

The United States has built a clause into its immigration law known as Temporary Protected Status (TPS) that allows people from certain countries to remain in the U.S. because their native countries have been deemed unsafe due to environmental conditions, violent conditions, or any other extreme scenario. This allows them to live, work, and travel to and from the U.S. during the length of time in which a Temporary Protected Status has been put in place. Read on to learn more about TPS and the recent announcement regarding Haitian immigrants.

Who is Eligible for TPS?

Temporary Protected Status is granted to individuals from countries that are experiencing difficult or dangerous situations, such as civil war, health epidemic, environmental disaster, or other factors that may prevent these nationals from returning home safely. Haiti was granted Temporary Protected Status after the 2010 earthquake that devastated the nation.

A Brief History of TPS for Haitians

As previously mentioned, Haiti was granted Temporary Protected Status in 2010. This TPS has been extended over the years until the Trump administration sought to end it in 2018. But, the Biden administration has recognized the devastating effects of COVID-19 on Haiti and its citizens.

What are the Latest Updates Regarding TPS?

According to CBS, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas has explained that “Haiti is currently experiencing serious security concerns, social unrest, an increase in human rights abuses, crippling poverty, and lack of basic resources, which are exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.” As a result, the United States is working to support Haitian nationals until they can safely return home to Haiti. According to BuzzFeed, “The Biden administration will grant more than 100,000 Haitians in the US the opportunity to gain temporary protected status, shielding them from deportation and allowing them to obtain work permits…”

It is important to note that this announcement only applies to Haitians who are currently in the U.S., and not those who travel to the country after the announcement was made.

If you have any questions or concerns about TPS or the latest updates, contact our firm today to speak with an experienced immigration attorney.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

 

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New Biometrics Rule has Been Withdrawn | What to Know

Biometrics is a major part of the immigration process. It refers to the collection of important data, such as fingerprints, photographs and/or signatures. This information is used to conduct background and security checks, among other things. Recently, a new rule regarding biometrics was proposed by the Department of Homeland Security. This rule would make the biometrics process much stricter. Read on to learn more about the rule and why it has been withdrawn.

What did the New Rule Entail?

According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the new rule would have expanded department authorities and requirements for collecting biometrics by removing age restrictions and requiring the submission of biometrics for every applicant, petitioner, sponsor, beneficiary, or other individual filing for, or associated with, any immigration or naturalization benefit. DHS was also looking to codify the authority to use DNA test results.

Why has the Rule Been Withdrawn?

According to uscis.gov, “DHS announced its decision to withdraw the proposed rule, originally published on Sept. 11, 2020, in a Federal Register notice. The withdrawal is consistent with the Executive Order 14012, Restoring Faith in Our Legal Immigration Systems and Strengthening Integration and Inclusion Efforts for New Americans, and additional administration priorities to reduce barriers and undue burdens in the immigration system.” Notably, a large number of biometrics appointments were delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, halting the immigration process for millions.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding biometrics or any other aspects of the immigration process, reach out to our firm today. We are here to advocate for you and walk you through the process every step of the way.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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Leaving the United States with a Green Card | What to Know

Obtaining a Green Card is incredibly exciting. This will mean you have a number of new rights and benefits. You may be wondering about your options when it comes to leaving the United States after obtaining your Green Card. Read on to learn more about the process of leaving the U.S. with a Green Card.

What Documents Do I Need to Leave and Re-Enter the United States with a Green Card?

If you wish to leave the United States, there are several important documents you will need. Some of these documents include a passport from your country of citizenship, or, if applicable, a refugee travel document that permits you to leave the country. In some cases, you may have to obtain a specific visa that permits you to leave the United States.

Upon returning to the U.S., you must present your Green Card to an officer with U.S. Customs and Border Protection. After the officer reviews your Green Card, passport, and driver’s license, you will most likely be allowed back into the United States. If you encounter any difficulties, you will need the help of an experienced and skilled immigration attorney.

How Long Can I leave the United States if I Have a Green Card?

If you have a Green Card, there is a very good chance that you will be allowed to leave the United States for an extended period of time. That being said, you must first apply for a re-entry permit with the Form I-131. If the form is approved, you can leave the United States and return without a problem, until your permit expires.

If you are someone who is not yet a naturalized citizen in the United States, there is a very good chance that if you leave for more than six months, you will likely disturb the continuous residency needed in order to become a naturalized citizen, which can prevent you from becoming naturalized. To avoid this, you can file an Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes in Form N-470.

If you have any questions or concerns or encounter any difficulties leaving and re-entering the country, contact our firm. Our team of dedicated attorneys is here for you.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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Helping a Relative Gain Citizenship in Wisconsin | What to Know

If you are a United States citizen with family living outside of the country, you may be wondering if/how you can help them gain citizenship. Depending on the situation, this may be done with a Form I-130. Read on to learn more about the process and what it entails.

Where Does the Form I-130 get filed?

Where you currently live plays a dramatic part in determining how you will file your Form I-130. If you are someone who is currently living in the United States, as a United States citizen, you will file your form either at the Phoenix, Chicago, or Dallas Lockbox. However, if you are a United States citizen living outside of the United States, and you are filing for an unmarried child under the age of 21, or for one of your parents, you will do so at the USCIS international office in the country where you are currently living. If you are a United States citizen who is living outside of the U.S. and in a country where there is not USCIS international lockbox, then you will have to file at the Dallas lockbox.

How Much Does it Cost to File an I-130 Form?

It will cost $535 to file. This can be expensive, so it is important to file correctly in order to avoid spending more. You will have to pay this fee either via personal check, money order, cashier’s check, or by credit card via Form G-1450, Authorization for Credit Card Transactions.

What Information do I Need to File a Form I-130?

It is crucial that you submit all necessary information when filing, which is why you should retain the assistance of an experienced immigration attorney. An attorney will walk you through the process and ensure that your forms are correctly filled out and filed. Some of the information you will need to submit includes evidence of your U.S. citizenship, U.S. national status, or lawful permanent residence, a copy of your child’s birth certificate (or your marriage certificate), a copy of your birth certificate, and more. The Form also requires you to submit the beneficiary’s full name, physical address, date of birth, and marital information.

If you have any questions or concerns about helping a relative gain U.S. Citizenship, contact our firm today. We are here to walk you through all of your immigration law needs.

Contact our experienced Wisconsin firm

John Sesini is an experienced immigration attorney with offices in Green Bay and Milwaukee Wisconsin. Our firm understands what is at stake when it comes to immigration law matters, which is why If you have any questions, you should not hesitate to contact the Sesini Law Group, S.C. and schedule your initial consultation with our firm today.

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